Guide The most fundamental right : contrasting perspectives on the Voting Rights Act

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Return to Book Page. The right to vote is the foundation of democratic government; all other policies are derived from it. The history of voting rights in America has been characterized by a gradual expansion of the franchise. American Indians are an important part of that story but have faced a prolonged battle to gain the franchise. One of the most important tools wielded by advocates of min The right to vote is the foundation of democratic government; all other policies are derived from it.

The '60s at Friday, August 6, Voting Rights Act

One of the most important tools wielded by advocates of minority voting rights has been the Voting Rights Act. The authors describe the struggle to obtain Indian citizenship and the basic right to vote, then analyze the cases brought under the Voting Rights Act, including three case studies. The final two chapters assess the political impact of these cases and the role of American Indians in contemporary politics. Get A Copy.

Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot: FLITE Resources

Hardcover , pages. Published March 1st by Cambridge University Press first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Native Vote , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. All Languages. More filters.

Sort order. Morgan rated it really liked it Dec 04, Rochelle Rogers rated it it was amazing Jun 02, Christopher rated it really liked it Apr 07, Beth Ann rated it liked it Mar 28, Courtney rated it liked it Jan 01, John Mercurio rated it it was ok Aug 22, Election observers have cracked down on officials in districts where minorities were arrested outside of polling places for minor traffic violations, ensured that voters in need of translation had the proper materials, and stopped intimidation by white voters.

They first assumed their posts following the passage of the Voting Rights Act, and for nearly 50 years they countered roadblocks put in place to stop minorities from voting. Now, people could feel the brunt of new voter ID laws, which require voters to show specific forms of approved identification before voting, passed by many state legislatures that cited fears of voter fraud. While is the first presidential election cycle since the Shelby ruling, several local elections have taken place in the intervening years, and Ms. Austin-Hillery says the Brennan Center has already seen some complications from implemented voter ID laws without federal observers in place to serve as a safeguard.

In the years since, "voters have been experiencing some issues. We fear that some of those have arisen as a result of not having those protections in place. The Justice Department plans to send observers to several jurisdictions that remain subject to a federal court order allowing their presence, including Alameda County in California, St. Some of these dispatched will be poll monitors, instead of observers, who lack the authority to do anything but report instances of intimidation.

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Without federal observers to intervene, voters who face intimidation or obstruction can only file lawsuits after the fact, a lengthy and expensive process that won't add lost votes back into the election. Meanwhile, poll workers in some parts of the nation are preparing for the worst. The extremely polarizing race has led some to worry about potential violence at the polls, after a GOP headquarters in North Carolina was firebombed last week.

While the thought of violence at the polls seems staggering to many white Americans, voting has frequently proven dangerous for people of color. I just think the loss of the DOJ is going to be really problematic. Native American voters have historically fallen victim to voter ID laws and voter intimidation, while Trump has specifically pointed out Philadelphia as a city where he claims voter fraud could occur.

And unfortunately they're scattered throughout the nation.

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Christian Science Perspective. October 19, By Amanda Hoover Staff amahoover. Why red state voting laws keep getting struck down. Get the Monitor Stories you care about delivered to your inbox. By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy.